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Introduction of Boot Camp Scholarship Scheme

Posted By Alexandra Wong, The Law Society of Upper Canada, Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Longstanding member Peter Berge stepped down from ACLEA’s Executive Committee just a few months before he was to become ACLEA’s President. In recognition of his involvement in ACLEA’s Boot Camp, where he has taught both technology and marketing to new members and his countless contributions to ACLEA over the years, not only as a member of the EC, but as co-chair of the Technology SIG, speaker/presenter on many occasions, and above all as a strong advocate of the goals and values of the organization, the EC is pleased to announce the annual “Peter Berge Boot Camp Scholarship”.   

 

This scholarship acknowledges Peter's exceptional and ongoing dedication to ACLEA and recognizes his significant role in our signature member orientation program, the ACLEA Boot Camp.  

 

The scholarship is intended to reflect many of the values that Peter holds dear to his heart – continuous learning, mentoring and giving back to the organization.   

 

We thank Peter for his commitment and generosity to ACLEA.  

 

The scholarship will be in place for the 2018 Mid-Year Meeting.  

 

For further information, contact Laurie Krueger, Executive Director at aclea@aclea.org

  

Tags:  ACLEA  ACLEAMTL  Boot Camp  Executive Committee  Technology 

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ICYMI – Executive Committee Announces Changes to Our Website

Posted By Alexandra Wong, The Law Society of Upper Canada, Thursday, July 6, 2017

One major initiative of the 2016/17 Business Plan has been a review of how members access ACLEA's website. This review was undertaken by a subcommittee of the Executive Committee, the Website Audit Committee (Directors Lucas Boling and Linda Russell together with Anna Wrisky, Ewald) and we are now delighted to reveal the fruits of their collective labors, the new Member Central page.

Many of you have provided feedback via member website focus groups and through surveys, which has ensured the changes are reflective of how members use the website and associated resources.
 
Together with the introduction of Member Central, changes have also been made to the top navigation in order to improve the functionality of the website. This is designed to assist you with finding the information you use most often.

The Executive Committee is keen to hear your feedback or suggestions, so please email Lucas Boling at lboling@mobar.org or Linda Russell at LindaR@cle.bc.ca

The website will continue to be updated based on feedback received from members by our wonderful Website Audit Committee. If you haven’t already done so, please take the time to provide feedback about the website in our Member Survey, which is open through July 7.

Tags:  ACLEA  Executive Committee  Member Survey  News  Website 

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The ABA’s MCLE Model Rule Is Finally Here!

Posted By Gina Roers-Liemandt, Wednesday, June 28, 2017
Untitled Document

This past February, the ABA House of Delegates adopted the new ABA Model Rule for Minimum Continuing Legal Education, which replaces the 1988 version of the rule. This new MCLE Model Rule represents the culmination of more than two years of work by the ABA’s Standing Committee on Continuing Legal Education (SCOCLE) in conjunction with more than 50 volunteers, including individual lawyers, ABA leaders, CLE regulators, CLE providers, judges, academics, law firm professional development coordinators, and state/local/specialty bar association leaders. Many ACLEA leaders and members were involved in each step of the process.

Like its predecessor, the new MCLE Model Rule recognizes the vital role MCLE plays in the legal profession. The Model Rule emphasizes several key goals in its Purpose statement, which provides: “To maintain public confidence in the legal profession and the rule of law, and to promote the fair administration of justice, it is essential that lawyers be competent regarding the law, legal and practice-oriented skills, the standards and ethical obligations of the legal profession, and the management of their practices.”

The Rule looks significantly different than its predecessor, employing a new structure and eliminating many specific provisions related to the administration of MCLE programs, such as the size and composition of a jurisdiction’s MCLE governing entity, methods of reporting MCLE credits, deadlines, fees, sanctions, appeals, and methods of financing MCLE administration. However, some key provisions have remained the same.

Both the new MCLE Model Rule and its predecessor:

  • Recommend 15 hours per year of MCLE (while recognizing that some jurisdictions prefer 12 hours).
  • Take no position on whether lawyers should report MCLE credits every 1, 2, or 3 years.
  • Recommend that jurisdictions have a system by which frequent MCLE sponsors can be designated “approved providers.”
  • Recommend that all lawyers be required to take diversity and inclusion programming (although, as noted below, the new MCLE Model Rule has a more specific requirement than its predecessor).
  • Recommend that speakers at MCLE programs have the necessary skills to teach the course, but do not require speakers to be lawyers.

Summary of some key components of the new MCLE Model Rule:

  • Requires lawyers to take the following specialty credits, which also count towards the general MCLE requirement: (1) Ethics and Professionalism (average one credit per year); (2) Diversity and Inclusion (one credit every three years); and (3) Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders (one credit every three years).
    • The Diversty and Inclusion credit requirement builds on existing ABA policy that encourages jurisdictions with MCLE to “include as a separate credit programs regarding diversity and inclusion in the legal profession of all persons regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, or disabilities, and programs regarding elimination of bias.”
    • The Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Credit recognizes that requiring all lawyers to receive education about these disorders can benefit both individual lawyers and the profession. This requirement is, in part, a response to the 2016 landmark study conducted by the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation and the American Bar Association Commission on Lawyer Assistance Programs, entitled, “The Prevalence of Substance Use and Other Mental Health Concerns Among American Attorneys.”
  • Accredits CLE program formats that include the use of distance learning, and does not limit the number of credits that can be earned using a particular delivery format.
  • Accredits CLE programs that address law practice and technology.
  • Allows lawyers to choose the MCLE programs that best meet their educational needs by not limiting the number of credits that can be earned in any subject area (e.g., substantive law, law practice, technology, ethics and professionalism, diversity and inclusion, and mental health and substance use disorders).
    Treats in-house sponsors of CLE programs the same as other sponsors and allows for full accreditation of programs when all other accreditation standards have been met. Also, the new MCLE Model Rule no longer places limits on the number of credits a lawyer can earn through in-house programming.
  • Encourages jurisdictions to adopt a special exemption for lawyers licensed in multiple jurisdictions, pursuant to which a lawyer is exempt from satisfying MCLE requirements if he or she satisfies the MCLE requirements of the jurisdiction where the lawyer’s principal office is located.
  • Recognizes that jurisdictions may choose to authorize additional exemptions from MCLE requirements for certain groups, such as retired lawyers. The new MCLE Model Rule does not contain the Comment from its predecessor that stated: “Exemptions are inconsistent with the purpose of MCLE and are not recommended.”
  • Creates a more narrow definition for “self-study” activities that are not approved for MCLE credit, including programming without interactivity, informal learning, and reading. Activities such as viewing programs online or on video are now defined elsewhere in the new MCLE Model Rule and are approved for MCLE credit.

A discussion of each of these provisions can be found in the Report that was submitted to the ABA House of Delegates with the new MCLE Model Rule.

SCOCLE has created an MCLE Model Rule Implementation Committee that will gather information on the Rule’s implementation and serve as a resource for jurisdictions. SCOCLE maintains a website, located at http://ambar.org/mclemodelrule, which contains links to the new MCLE Model Rule, its accompanying Report, and other materials. It is the ABA’s hope that jurisdictions will undertake a review of the MCLE Model Rule and consider integrating some or all of its provisions into their MCLE rules.

Tags:  MCLE  MCLE model rule  Minimum Continuing Legal Education 

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In Case You Missed It - Points of Interest in Montreal

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Just over two months away before ACLEA's 53rd Annual Meeting Montreal.  Take a look at places to see while in Montreal. 

http://www.aclea.org/news/342494/Montral-or-Bust.htm

 

 

 

Tags:  53rd Annual Meeting  ACLEAMTL  Montreal  Networking 

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Special Recognition Awards Handed Out at the Mid-Year Meeting in Nashville

Posted By Alexandra Wong, The Law Society of Upper Canada, Monday, March 13, 2017

At the Mid-Year meeting in Nashville, ACLEA recognized the contributions of two well-known, highly respected members, Pat Nester and Larry Center.

 

Pat was presented with the inaugural Lifetime Achievement Award and Larry was presented with the President’s Award to recognize their contributions to CLE and the association over the years.

 

When asked to describe Pat and his contributions to the CLE profession, Larry provided me with the following,

 

“Pat has been a friend and mentor to so many of us within the CLE profession for more than 30 years.  He is respected, admired and, dare I say it, beloved, by dozens of us who have been fortunate enough to come under his influence.  He has both a pioneer and an innovator in continuing legal education. His leadership style is unmatched. His thoughtfulness is remarkable. His insight and wisdom have driven our profession. His passion and compassion continue to be the foundation of his decisions. We are all so lucky to have had Pat in our lives.”

 

Pat provided me with the following when asked the same question:

 

“Larry was probably the most frequent speaker at ACLEA programs over the last twenty years and deservedly so. His frequent focus was on the personal traits that CLE professionals need to lead and succeed. I think all of us experienced CLE folks think of Larry as the moral leader of ACLEA with the courage to see the underlying problems that we confront and to ask how we can change ourselves to deal with them. When you think about it, that’s what good education is all about, and Larry gave us--and me--a great model to emulate. Plus, putting aside CLE and ACLEA, Larry is just an excellent human being, and we are all privileged to know him.”

 

Thank you Pat and Larry for all that you've done and continue to do for CLE and ACLEA. 

Tags:  ACLEA  Awards  CLE  Mid-Year Meeting  Nashville 

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State Bar of California Proposal for MCLE Providers to Report Attendance

Posted By June Hahm, Crowell & Moring LLP, Friday, February 3, 2017

The State Bar of California proposed a requirement for California MCLE providers to report attendance of all its CLE offerings to the Bar. The proposal which was presented during the August MCLE Provider Meetings was developed in response to issues that the Bar discovered during past MCLE audits. Issues included failure to properly record actual time of online course completion, and miscalculation of hours.

 

The Bar’s initial concept was to build a database that providers would access to input all relevant CLE course and attendance information for each course. Many providers, especially nonprofit providers, were concerned when told that the costs of setting up this type of reporting system would be passed on to providers through attendance reporting fees.

 

 

 

Below are links to the video recordings of the MCLE Provider Meetings.

MCLE Provider Meeting (August 23, 2016)

MCLE Provider Meeting (August 30, 2016)

Tags:  CLE  MCLE  State Bar California 

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Join ACLEA to network in the friendliest city of 2016!

Posted By Kristin Huotari, State Bar of Wisconsin, Wednesday, January 11, 2017
Untitled Document

Every year Travel + Leisure conducts a survey asking people to rate their perceptions as visitors to 38 metro areas.  The survey asks respondents to offer their opinions on the local style, cultural attractions, dining experiences, and overall friendliness.  The scores are then ranked and a winner is selected.

And the friendliest city in 2016 is….NASHVILLE!!! 

Visitors said they loved the music, food, and welcoming atmosphere of this fine city.  And our lucky ACLEA members will be able to experience all of this for themselves, along with locals who are eager to share their home with us.  The 53rd mid-year meeting will be held at the Loew’s Vanderbilt Hotel, January 28-31, 2017.

Networking galore!

The best thing about coming to an ACLEA conference is catching up with old friends and making new ones.  And Nashville will be just the place for you to accomplish all of that, along with bringing innovative and proven initiatives back to your shop.  We’ll be bringing you sessions with a deep dive into data, marketing, hiring, and entrepreneurship. 

And with the networking opportunities, you are bound to have a good time.  Receptions, fitness, karaoke, and the closing Honky Tonk Dinner where ACLEA will take over the Tin Roof on Broadway for dinner, dancing, and live music! The Tin Roof on Broadway opened in 2014 in the former Hatch Show Print Building nestled among Nashville’s legendary Honky Tonks. Over the years, their stages have hosted the famous, the should-have-been famous, and everyone in between.

So don’t miss a chance to enjoy good food, good music, and good times at ACLEA’s Mid-Year Meeting!

>> Tell Me More

>> Sign Me Up!

 

Tags:  ACLEA  mid-year meeting  nashville  networking 

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Book Review: Captivate: Presentations that Engage and Inspire

Posted By Earl Dumitru, President, Association of Law Officers of the Crown, Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Anyone can do this.

~ Steve Hughes

As a firm introvert who (too occasionally…) has the privilege of speaking with an audience of up to 500 people, I am always on the lookout for good practical advice on presentations. ACLEA has definitely earned its registration fee this year by introducing me to the work of Steve Hughes.

Many of you will have witnessed a Steve Hughes presentation in person – as part of his “Hit Your Stride” programming, as a speaker at your CLE events, or at ACLEA (including the recent Seattle meeting). Now there is a helpful and easy-to-read book length companion ­— Captivate: Presentations that Engage and Inspire.

Captivate has 4 main parts: Crafting Your Talk, Making it Engaging, Delivering Your Speech, and Polishing Your Skills. Each is divided into 5-7 distinct (but well cross-referenced) chapters on discrete topics. You can read the whole book to see the process/flow of crafting and delivering a talk, or you can access specific topics as needed.

One fun — and helpful — feature is that the book is written as a presentation and applies many of the recommended strategies. For example, storytelling is a powerful tool used in presentations. Chapters 7 and 12 recommend leading with a story (or another attention grabber) and coming back to more administrative matters and introductions. And, you guessed it, Chapter 1 is a story about the big Memphis speech while Chapter 2 is “How to Use this Book’”

Some of my key practical takeaways include:

  • SPARQ – Grabbing Their Attention from Word One (Ch. 7) – puts the current focus on storytelling in a broader context and gives you additional tools for opening.
  • Content trumps delivery; the best delivery is authentic.
  • Use eye contact with the audience, enough time to deliver a single thought (probably a sentence or two).
  • Do not end your presentation with a Q&A. It can be near the end, but not the very end — you want to control the final message to the audience.

As an added bonus, ACLEA has previously commissioned 4 Steve Hughes “Train the Trainer Videos” which are available on the website: www.aclea.org/?page=train_the_trainer. I found the “Using PowerPoint Effectively” video especially compelling as it addressed how to better present the type of detailed technical information that is often at the core of CLE sessions.

So, my call to action: read the book, watch the videos, and feel more confident about your next presentation!

Tags:  book review  captivate  presentation  Steve Hughes 

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Is the Future of Marketing Already Here?

Posted By Carmen Hill, Director of Marketing, Connective DX, Thursday, November 17, 2016

ACLEA’s 52nd annual conference in Seattle featured a series of TED-style talks focused on the future and what different aspects of the legal profession and continuing legal education might be like in 2025. This post is based on one of those talks, The Future of Marketing, presented by Carmen Hill.

Is the Future of Marketing Already Here?

By Carmen Hill

 

It’s hard to believe, but by the time 2025 rolls around, it will have been 50 years since the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the right of lawyers to advertise their services in the case of Bates vs. State Bar of Arizona. During that time we’ve seen changes that would have seemed like science fiction: the internet, smartphones, social media, marketing automation… the list goes on and on.

 

Meanwhile, legal marketing evolved (devolved?) into the over-the-top genre of late-night TV and billboard ads that inspired the hit Netflix series Better Call Saul. And it’s safe to say change is only going to accelerate between now and 2025.

Meet the Class of 2025

In 2025, there will be almost 10 more years of new, young lawyers in the field, and many older lawyers will have retired by then. Generation Z is the cohort of six to 18-year-olds that makes up 25% of the U.S. population. In just a few years they’ll account for 40% of all consumers.

 

It almost goes without saying that this will be a generation of digital natives. Lawyers who graduate in 2025 have never experienced life without the internet or Google. They’ve been able to tap an iPhone screen since they were in second grade, and swipe right for “yes” or left for “no” since they were old enough to go on their first date.

 

Meanwhile, millennials, or Generation Y,  are already the largest generation in the U.S. workforce. By 2025 they’ll make up nearly half of it. You may already be sick of hearing about millennials, but ignore them at your peril. More than 70% of millennials are involved in researching or making decisions about what products and services their companies buy (The Next Generation of B2B). And they are far more likely to use digital channels like search engines and social media to make those decisions.

The Future Is Already Here

It’s not just the future of marketing that will be digital; it’s the present. Today, you’re not only competing with other law firms for attention you’re competing with everything else on the internet. The days when you could buy an ad and expect millions of people to see it are long gone. Because at the same time marketers look to technology for new ways to reach consumers, those same consumers are finding new ways to filter them out.

 

First we had the mute button. Then we had TiVo and DVRs. Now, a lot of people—especially younger people—are getting rid of their TV altogether and watching online. Oh, and if you want to reach people online? That’s getting harder too.

 
  • There’s a less than one percent chance that someone will click on your banner ad (Think with Google).

  • And 41% of millennials will never see your ad to start with, because they’re using ad blocking software (Page Fair).

The Generation Gap

Jill Switzer, who writes for Above the Law, says both oldster and youngster lawyers are battling for the same slice of the shrinking pie. One of the “youngsters” is Bryan Wilson, from Fort Worth, Texas: The Texas Law Hawk. He graduated from Texas Tech law school a few years ago, and was voted “Most likely to do a TV commercial.” But he put a millennial twist on that notion: rather than pay big bucks for TV advertising, he made funny videos with his friends and posted them on YouTube.


This Fourth of July-themed ad is one of several that Bryan Wilson has produced. This one alone has had nearly 200,000 views on YouTube.

 

Wilson spent just $500 on his first ad and not a whole lot more than that on the others. But his phone is ringing off the hook. In this recent interview with D Magazine he said his biggest problem right now is that he has too many clients.

 

Others are disrupting not only legal marketing, but also legal services. Joshua Browder, a 19-year-old Stanford University student, launched a chat bot app called DoNotPay (Business Insider). It helps people who can’t afford a lawyer to fight simple legal battles like parking tickets for free. His “robot lawyer” has already beat more than 150-thousand tickets. Joshua Browder isn’t paying for advertising… he’s getting it all for free in the form of media coverage.

So, what’s next?

The Guardian writes that over the next 10 years most marketing will become like Amazon Recommends on steroids. If it creeps you out to have a pair of shoes you saw on Zappos follow you around the internet, just wait till your refrigerator tells you it’s time to stock up on ketchup—or even places the order for you on Amazon. Technology, combined with both big data and small data, will make it possible for marketers to be even more targeted, personalized and automated than we already are.

 

What if lawyer ads appeared on your car dashboard when you have an accident or get pulled over? This is not all that far-fetched. Several years ago Mercedes unveiled its concept of an augmented reality dashboard at the Consumer Electronics Show. And some predict that within only a few years, 90% of cars will be connected to the internet (CNN).

 

Wi-Fi-enabled cars could offer some intriguing opportunities for audience targeting: For example, parents and kids on the way to school or people commuting to work. What if you’re not even driving your car? How does a driverless car talk its way out of a ticket? This is what’s coming, sooner than you think.

Digital Trends You Should Not Ignore

It’s impossible to say for sure what marketing will look like in 2025, but many of the same trends are affecting every business. As we’re already seeing, communication will become increasingly fragmented, broken into smaller bits on mobile devices and social media. Generation Z will be filtering what they choose to see and hear with split-second speed and precision. And it will all be happening all the time.

 

While you’re waiting to see what comes next, there are a few future-friendly things that simply cannot wait.

  1. Make sure your website loads fast. You’ve only got a couple of seconds to show someone why they should stick around.

  2. Make sure your website is mobile-friendly with a responsive design that is easy for visitors to use on any device. If you don’t, site visitors will punish you by leaving, and Google will punish you with a bad search ranking.

  3. Invest in high-quality, valuable content that meets the needs of your prospective clients. Because if you don’t, your competitors else will.

Technology Is Just an Enabler

Regardless of where technology goes, the future of marketing still comes down to people. Nearly 40% of people still choose a lawyer the way they did a century ago: through someone they know (Moses & Rooth). No billboard, TV ad or even viral YouTube video holds a candle to the recommendations of trusted friends, family and colleagues. In short, understand the clients you’re trying to reach. Be helpful. Be interesting. And focus on providing the kind of experiences that clients love, even before they become a client.

 

Tags:  CLE  Marketing  Seattle  Technology 

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Compulsory Technology Programming as part of MCLE

Posted By Heather Elwell, Monday, October 24, 2016

Hello ACLEA!

 

Our CLE colleagues in Florida look to be the first jurisdiction required to navigate compulsory tech programming as part of mandatory CLE.  As described in the article below, Florida attorneys must complete 33 hours of CLE over a three-year period, of which three (3) hours must be an approved technology program. 

 

As an ACLEA member for the past 5 years,  I have been impressed by the significant effort that ACLEA has made to emphasize the importance of technology in our programs and publications for attorneys, as well as in running our own organizations effectively.  The Seattle conference, for example, included a plenary on The Future of Productivity, a deep drive on Reimagining Learning with Microsoft OneNote and Sway, and the famous tech tips and tricks session which focused on the iPad for CLE Professionals.  The upcoming Nashville conference will also walk the technology line with session on Redefining Technology Competence in a 21st Century Law Practice, Website and Search Engine Optimization, and PDF, Word, and Automation – How to Build an Effective Electronic Forms Strategy.

 

With regulators now joining the movement to incorporate technology into CLE,  we can expect technology and innovation to continue to be in the forefront of ACLEA programing.  Please share your experiences below.

 

https://bol.bna.com/florida-is-first-state-to-require-technology-cles/

Tags:  CLE  Florida  Nashville  Seattle  Technology 

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